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Spring 2008 Honors Sections of SAS Courses

 


ART HISTORY
Honors Seminar II
01:082:112 Index # 66032
To enroll in this course, you must be enrolled in 01:082:106 (Introduction to Art History).
Professor Catherine Puglisi
Th 3:05-4:00P Art Library Seminar Room
College Ave Campus

This course, Art History Honors Seminar II (082:112) is attached to the second half of 01:082:106, Introduction to Art History.  To enroll in this course, you must be enrolled in 01:082:106 (Introduction to Art History).  We meet on Wednesdays from 3:05-4:00 pm, once every two to three weeks, in addition to the regularly scheduled weekly recitation.  Enrollment is limited to 12 students.  This honors section offers the opportunity to explore wider issues in art history in a seminar setting.  We will also review essential skills for composing a research paper and presenting an oral report in art history (in substitution for the museum paper required in 106).  During the semester, two of our meetings will be field trips to museums or artistic events in New York—these will be scheduled on a Friday afternoon to avoid conflicts.

 

ECONOMICS
Introduction to Macroeconomics – Honors
01:220:103:H1 Index #65705
Pre- or Co-Requisite: 01:640:111 or 115 or placement
Professor Neil Sheflin
MTH 9:50-11:10A MU- 301
College Ave Campus

What’s GDP, and why does it matter?  What does China’s exchange rate have to do with anything? What causes unemployment and what can we do about it? What’s inflation, and what harm does it cause? How fast will our economy and our wealth grow? What is money and what role does it have in the economy? What’s the Fed and what does it do? What's bad about government deficits and the national debt? The trade deficit? How does international trade impact our economy? What causes recessions, and what can we do about them?  What’s the role of the stock market and how can you make (and lose) a fortune on it?

Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the aggregate economy and deals with the determinants of a nation’s output and income, the determinants of the average level of prices and their rate of change (inflation), and the determinants of growth in an economy. While an Introductory Microeconomics course is highly recommended, it is not required if one is prepared to quickly catch-up. Above all, this is intended to be an interesting, important, useful, and demanding course dealing with issues you will certainly face in your private, public, and professional lives and which will provide you with useful and usable skills and insights.

The honors section will differ from the standard Introduction to Macroeconomics in a number of important ways.  First and most obvious, it will be a small class allowing for much more interaction, and much more attention to each students needs.  While the coverage will be similar, there will be more supplementary material in this section, including web-based readings, data-based and analytical exercises, and more use of statistical/econometric modeling.  Students will be expected to develop a broader and deeper grasp of the material.  More writing in the form of collaborative projects will be incorporated via the use of wikis. Quizzes and the final will consist of short answer and short essay questions as well as some multiple choice, and there will be considerable feedback, assuring that students learn from their errors rather than repeating them.  Also, pastries will be served weekly.

Neil Sheflin, (732) 932 7834, fax (732)932 7416
Department of Economics   web: econweb.rutgers.edu/sheflin
428 New Jersey Hall
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1248
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

FRENCH
Approaches to French Literature - Honors
01:420:218:H1 Index #73013
Prerequisite: placement test or French 132
Professor Mary Shaw
TTH 2:15-3:35P  RAB 109A
Douglass Campus

Introduction to French literature through close reading of texts from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. We will pay special attention to the nature of literary works (style, structure, genre, narrative voice) and to the goals and methods of literary analysis. Readings include the medieval tale of La Châtelaine de Vergy; prose and poetry from major Renaissance authors (Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Ronsard, Louise Labé); classical plays (Molière’s L'Ecole des femmes, Racine’s Phèdre) and fairy tales; a philosophical tale from the Enlightenment (Voltaire’s L’Ingénu); and excerpts from the Encyclopédie.

The course aims to sharpen reading comprehension, essay-writing skills, and oral comprehension. Students should expect to write frequent short critical essays during the term, prepare readings carefully, and participate actively in class discussions. Midterm and final examinations monitor mastery of the readings and of techniques of textual analysis. The final grade will be based on class participation, compositions, and examinations.

Texts:
Perrault, Contes, Folio classique, (9782070372812)
Molière, L'Ecole des femmes, Classiques Bordas, (20473032664)
Voltaire, L’ingénu, Classiques Larousse, (2035877369)
Racine, Phèdre, Classiques Larousse, (203871682X)
Robert, Le Robert Micro Poche de la langue Française, (2850365297)

Honors equivalent to French 216 - special permission is required.
***Please note you cannot take 216 AND 218.***

 

LINGUISTICS
Honors: Introduction to Linguistics Theory
01:615:201:H1 Index # 65309
Professor Paul de Lacy
MW 02:50-4:10P HH-B4
College Ave Campus

Linguistics investigates the structural properties of human language.  A principal goal of multidisciplinary cognitive science is to understand how the mind acquires, configures, and processes linguistic knowledge.  Linguistic theory aims to specify precisely what that knowledge is.  In this course, we focus primarily on sentence structure (syntax) and sound structure (phonology).
For syntax we will develop a theory that can generate sentences like “The cat ate an apple”, but not sentences like *“The ate cat apple an”.  We will also determine why it is possible to say “John dies,” “John hurt a newt,” and “John gave a newt an apple,” but not *“John dies a newt” and *”John hurt a newt an apple.”
For phonology we will develop a theory that can explain why words like blick and fing are possible English words, but not *bnik or *seeng.  We will also examine processes like expletive infixation. 
This course goes beyond standard Linguistics 201 by exploring Optimality Theory in detail and by examining data from a wide range of languages other than English.
Course work will consist of assignments that apply and extend ideas and techniques introduced in class.
Requirements:
1. Attendance and Participation.
2. There will be three major assignments and two major in-class exams. 
3. There is no final exam.
Textbook: Provided free.


MATH
Topics of Math for Liberal Arts: Sharing Secrets in Public
01:640:103:H1 Index# 73134  
Professor Stephen Miller
TF 9:50-11:10A SC-205
College Ave Campus

Imagine an internet without privacy: your e-mails could be read by any motivated eavesdropper, your credit card and bank account information would be public knowledge, and the passwords you enter could never be secret. You could pretend to be anyone, and anyone could pretend to be you. The internet would be brought to its knees without its users trusting that it could keep secrets. But do we actually live in such a world?

This course is about cryptology, the science of hiding information. Historically, sharing secrets over long distances typically meant two parties first had to agree on a password, and then send messages to each other using their secret password. But how can they agree on a password in the first place unless they meet in person, or have a trusted courier?

We will focus mainly on the amazing breakthroughs made in the last 30 years which effectively exploit difficult mathematics problems as a trusted courier. It used to be that these problems frustrated mathematicians; now they are used as locks, challenging problem solvers to pick them. They enable two people who have never met nor communicated with each other to share secrets in public. The problems are typically very simple to state and understand, but practically speaking nobody knows how to solve them fast enough to break these "locks". How do they work? What would it take for someone to break them? What would happen then?

The course will consist of three parts. In the first part we describe some traditional cryptographic ciphers, and the mathematics which breaks them. The second consists of the mathematical "locks and keys" used to keep secrets. In the third part, we explore aspects of mathematics in security, for example in ATM machines, cell phones, remote control car locks, electronic voting machines, DVD encryption, cable TV, ID cards, and more. The mathematics needed is at an elementary level. Assignments include term papers about topics in security.

This course is not usable as an elective toward the Mathematics major or minor.

 

Calculus for the Mathematical and Physical Sciences II (Honors Section)
01:640:152:H1 Index #66910
MW 5:00-6:20P ARC-333 TH 5:00-6:20P ARC-205
Busch Campus

Math 152 is the second semester of the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering. The first semester, Math 151, presents the differential calculus and ends with an introduction to the integral calculus. The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and other topics as well.  Students earning a grade of B or better in Math 151 H1 or H2, and other strong students from regular sections of 151, may apply for permission to take Calculus 152 H1 at the Undergraduate Office of the Mathematics Department, Hill Center 303.

 

PHILOSOPHY
Introduction to Philosophy - Honors
01:730:103:H1 Index #65285
Professor Brian Weatherson
MTH 9:50-11:10A  MU-112
College Ave Campus

This course is an introduction to fundamental philosophical issues.  Topics will include the evidence we have for and against God’s existence, how we could know about the external world, and the nature of justice.  Readings will focus on classic works by philosophers such as Descartes and Hume, but we will also look at some contemporary work.  Students will write several short papers during the term, and there will be a final exam.

 

PHYSICS
Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science - Honors
01:750:106:H1 Index #70880 
Professor Paul Leath
MTH 11:30A-12:50P  VD-211
College Ave Campus

This course is designed for humanities and social science students. There are no prerequisites and no mathematical problem-solving. The course will focus upon major astronomical and physical discoveries in the scientific and social context of their time, from Aristotle to the present. Topics will include Greek astronomy and science, Galileo, Newton, the mechanical universe, gravity, entropy, the arrow of time, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic induction and waves, optics, relativity, quantum theory, X-rays, atoms, nuclei, anti matter, and black holes. The emphasis will be on understanding the world in which we live and how things work around us, from nature, to simple devices, to high-tech equipment. The course will be conceptual, qualitative, and, hopefully, student-active, with class discussions and simple hands-on experiments conducted at the Math/Science Learning Center.  For more information, examine the course Website at physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/106/

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Advanced Studies in Law - The Role of Courts In A Democratic Society
01:790:410:H1 Index # 71652
Instructor: John Adams
T 1:10-4:10P MI-010
College Ave Campus

Democracy has been described as governance by the majority, subject to the rule of law. What do we mean by “the rule of law,” and to the extent we accept the proposition that courts make law, how does this fit within the idea of democracy?  Since WW II there has been a significant increase in judicial involvement in the making not only of law itself, but, as well, in determining of public policy. This raises the question as to the democratic legitimacy of their actions. We may ask two questions: first, whether it is democratic; and second, whether it is justifiable.

 This seminar is intended to examine not so much the correctness of judicial decisions, but the role courts properly should play in the democratic process. We will review the nature of law, and what we mean by “the rule of law;” the social functions of law and courts; the concepts of judicial reasoning and review; and the court’s function in the constitutional separation of powers and checks and balances. While the discussion will focus principally on courts in the United States, we will also look at courts in other developed and developing countries.

We will examine not only the normative role of law and the courts, but also how they work in practice and the implications of courts making public policy. The discussions will include an analysis of contemporary opinion of judicial decisions in landmark U.S, Supreme Court cases such as Brown v. Board of Education, Roe v. Wade, Handi v. Rumsfeld, and Gore v. Bush. We will ask whether, for instance, morality is a necessary element of judicial decisions, whether courts should act where the legislature fails, and how we should hold judges accountable.

This course is scheduled to meet 14 times, once a week for three hours. It will consist principally of class discussion, student presentations, and a final paper of no more than ten pages. Grade distribution will be, more or less, divided equally among these three activities.

The moderator of the seminar is John Adams who holds degrees from Rutgers University (BA, 1965), Seton Hall University (JD, 1968), and New York University (LLM, 1975). He practiced law for 15 years, and was president of a New York based investment firm for 20 years. He currently is Chairman of the Oxford University affiliated Foundation for Law, Justice and Society. It is his intention of bringing these experiences to the seminar discussions.

Advanced Studies in Law - The Law of Higher Education
01:790:410:H3 Index # 73813
Instructor: Jonathan Alger- Vice President and General Counsel
T 2:50-5:50P  SC-207
College Ave Campus

This upper-level seminar will explore key laws and legal concepts applicable to American institutions of higher education. With a focus on the educational mission, the notion of academic freedom, and the unique features of the higher education context, the course will focus on how the law balances the rights and responsibilities of colleges and universities and their many and varied constituencies--including faculty, staff, students, and the public at large. The course will also explore the increasingly complex regulatory environment facing colleges and universities, and the relationships of these institutions to all levels of government in society. Specific topics of discussion will include (among others): the rights and responsibilities of faculty and students in and outside the classroom; codes of conduct and due process; freedom of expression; freedom from discrimination; affirmative action; the roles of religion and politics in higher education; ownership and use of intellectual property in the academic environment; and the regulation of intercollegiate athletics. As part of the course experience, students will be introduced to legal reasoning and gain an understanding of the American legal system.

The course format will include a significant amount of class discussion, with some small group exercises. It will meet once a week (during back-to-back class periods) for three hours. All students will be expected to complete the reading each week and to participate actively in discussions. The class requirements will include a research paper and an open-book, take-home final exam.

 

PSYCHOLOGY
Physiological Psychology
01:830:313:H1 Index # 72905
Professor Mark West
MTH 10:20-11:40A ARC-212
Busch Campus

REQUIRED TEXT Package at New Jersey Books or Rutgers Bookstore includes: Physiology of Behavior by Neil Carlson, 9th Edition Study Guide (both CD and paperback), Brain Atlas for 830:313  (booklet and study guide are included with textbook)

Systems of Psychotherapy
01:830:393:H1 Index #69797
Professor Deirdre Kramer
TTH 1:40-3:00P TIL 209
Livingston Campus

We will explore the nature of psychotherapy and different ways of doing therapy, based on major schools of thought. Through readings, case studies, films, class discussions, and papers we will explore the nature of change in therapy, how different schools of thought conceptualize this change, what the therapeutic process entails within each school, what factors promote successful change, and what therapy means to both client and therapist.

 

Cognition Honors
01:830:305:H1  Index#75604
Dr. Alan Leslie,
W5,6 (3:20-6:20) ARC 110
Busch Campus

Spring 2009 Honors Sections of SAS Courses

 

 


CHEMISTRY

 

Honors General Chemistry
160:164:01 Index #47066
Prereq: 160:163 or Permission of Instructor
Co-req: 640:136 or 640:152
For well-prepared students
Professor Joseph Potenza
MW 1:55-2:50 PM, Th 3:35-4:30 PM, WL-AUD
Th 12:15-1:10 PM, ARC 110
Busch Campus

160:164:02: Index #47067
Prereq: 160:163 or Permission of Instructor
Co-req: 640:136 or 640:152
For well-prepared students
Professor Joseph Potenza
MW 1:55-2:50 PM, Th 3:35-4:30 PM, WL-AUD
Th 12:15-1:10 PM, SEC 203
Busch Campus

Principles of Organic Chemistry
160:316:01 Index #54025
Pre-re: 160:164, or Permission of Instructor
Professor Laurence Romsted
MW 3:20-4:40 WL AUD
M 1:55-2:50 PM, ARC 207
Busch Campus

160:316:02 Index #40169
Pre-req: 160:164, or Permission of Instructor
Professor Laurence Romsted
MW 1:40-3:00 WL AUD
M 5:15-6:10 PM, SEC 202
Busch Campus

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Literature Across Borders
01:195:201:H1 Index #53757
Professor Jorge Marcone
MTH 9:50-11:00A     MI- 100
College Ave Campus

ECONOMICS

Introduction to Macroeconomics – Honors
01:220:103:H1 Index #45332
Pre- or Co-Requisite: 01:640:111 or 115 or placement
MTH 9:50-11:10A    MU- 301
College Ave Campus

FRENCH

Approaches to French Literature - Honors
01:420:218:H1 Index #50893
Prerequisite: placement test or French 132
TTH 2:15-3:35P  RAB 109A
Professor Mary Speer
Douglass Campus

Introduction to French literature through close reading of texts from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.  We will pay special attention to the nature of literary works (genre, style, structure, narrative voice) and to the goals and methods of literary analysis.  Readings include the medieval tale of La Châtelaine de Vergy; prose and poetry from major Renaissance authors (Rabelais, Montaigne, Ronsard, Louise Labé); three classical plays (Corneille’s Le Cid, Molière’s Dom Juan, Racine’s Phèdre); a philosophical tale from the Enlightenment (Voltaire’s L’Ingénu); and excerpts from the Encyclopédie.

The course aims to sharpen reading comprehension, essay-writing skills, and oral comprehension.  Students should expect to write frequent short critical essays during the term, prepare readings carefully, and participate actively in class discussions.  Midterm and final examinations monitor mastery of the readings and of techniques of textual analysis.  The final grade will be based on class participation, compositions, and examinations.

Texts:
Corneille: Le Cid.  Petits Classiques Larousse: Texte intégral.  ISBN 2035831989
Molière: Don Juan.  Petits Classiques Larousse: Texte intégral.  ISBN 2035831997
Racine: Phèdre.  Petits Classiques Larousse: Texte intégral.  ISBN 2038714080
Voltaire: L’Ingénu.  Petits Classiques Larousse: Texte intégral.  ISBN 2035832144
Robert, Le Robert Micro Poche de la langue Française, ISBN 2850365297

Honors equivalent to French 216 - special permission is required.
***Please note you cannot take 216 AND 218.***

LINGUISTICS

Honors: Introduction to Linguistics Theory
01:615:201:H1 Index #44970
Professor Paul de Lacy
W 11:30-12:50P F 01:10-02:30P SC-104
College Ave Campus

Linguistics investigates the structural properties of human language.  A principal goal of multidisciplinary cognitive science is to understand how the mind acquires, configures, and processes linguistic knowledge.  Linguistic theory aims to specify precisely what that knowledge is.  In this course, we focus primarily on sentence structure (syntax) and sound structure (phonology).  For syntax we will develop a theory that can generate sentences like “The cat ate an apple”, but not sentences like *“The ate cat apple an”.  We will also determine why it is possible to say “John dies,” “John hurt a newt,” and “John gave a newt an apple,” but not *“John dies a newt” and *”John hurt a newt an apple.”
For phonology we will develop a theory that can explain why words like blick and fing are possible English words, but not *bnik or *seeng.  We will also examine processes like expletive infixation.   This course goes beyond standard Linguistics 201 by exploring Optimality Theory in detail and by examining data from a wide range of languages other than English.  Course work will consist of assignments that apply and extend ideas and techniques introduced in class.

MATH

Topics of Math for Liberal Arts
01:640:103:H1 Index #53935        
TF 9:50-11:10A     MU-112
College Ave Campus

For thousands of years, people have tried to communicate secretly and securely.  Cryptography is the field of mathematics dedicated to exploring schemes to conceal messages and to verifying the difficulty of breaking those schemes.  There has been an enormous increase in cryptographic work in the past few years because of the growth of computer network use.  This course will present mathematical concepts and processes within the context of social issues related to cryptography.  Issues explored may include the security of email; the privacy of medical records; the security of financial transactions; and the future > of copyright in the digital world.  Mathematical tools such as modular addition, finite fields, combinatorics, number theory, probability, group theory, and algorithms will be introduced.

This course is suitable only for students who would ordinarily be taking Math for the Liberal Arts.  The Department of Mathematics has a 300-level course in cryptography for Math majors and minors.

For information about registration in other honors courses in the Department of Mathematics, go to the Department of Mathematics Honors Course Information Page:
http://www.math.rutgers.edu/undergrad/Honors/honcourses.html or contact the Undergraduate Mathematics Office (Hill Center 303) at 732-445-2390.

Calculus for the Mathematical and Physical Sciences II (Honors Section)
01:640:152:H1 Index #46436
MW 5:00-6:20P ARC-333 TH 5:00-6:20P    ARC-205
Busch Campus

Math 152 is the second semester of the introductory year course in the calculus sequence in New Brunswick for majors in the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and engineering. The first semester, Math 151, presents the differential calculus and ends with an introduction to the integral calculus. The second semester, Math 152, continues the study of the integral calculus, with applications, and covers the theory of infinite series and power series, touching on differential equations and other topics as well.  Students earning a grade of B or better in Math 151 H1 or H2, and other strong students from regular sections of 151, may apply for permission to take Calculus 152 H1 at the Undergraduate Office of the Mathematics Department, Hill Center 303.

Multivariable Calculus (Honors Section)
01:641:251:H1 Index #50980
MWTH 05:00-06:20P    ARC-204
Busch Campus

PHYSICS

Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science - Honors
01:750:106:H1 Index #49639    
Professor Paul Leath
MTH 11:30A-12:50P     VD-211
College Ave Campus

This course is designed for humanities and social science students. There are no prerequisites and no mathematical problem-solving. The course will focus upon major astronomical and physical discoveries in the scientific and social context of their time, from Aristotle to the present. Topics will include Greek astronomy and science, Galileo, Newton, the mechanical universe, gravity, entropy, the arrow of time, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic induction and waves, optics, relativity, quantum theory, X-rays, atoms, nuclei, anti matter, and black holes. The emphasis will be on understanding the world in which we live and how things work around us, from nature, to simple devices, to high-tech equipment. The course will be conceptual, qualitative, and, hopefully, student-active, with class discussions and simple hands-on experiments conducted at the Math/Science Learning Center.  For more information, examine the course Website at http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/106/

Honors Physics II
01:750:272
MW 03:35-04:30P  PHY-LH
Recitation Section
Section 01 TH 10:35-11:30A  ARC-206- Index #44600
02: F 12:15-01:10P  ARC-206- Index #44668
03: F 01:55-02:50P  ARC-206- Index #45055
Busch Campus

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Advanced Studies in Law - The Role of Courts in A Democratic Society
01:790:410:H1 Index #50068
Instructor: John Adams, Esq.
T 02:50-05:50P MI-010
College Ave Campus

This seminar is intended to examine not so much the correctness of judicial decisions, but the role courts properly should play in the democratic process. Democracy has been described as governance by the majority, subject to the rule of law. We will review the nature of law, and what we mean by “the rule of law;” the social functions of law and courts; the concepts of judicial reasoning and review; and the court’s function in the constitutional separation of powers and checks and balances. While the discussion will focus principally on courts in the United States, we will also look at courts in other developed and developing countries.

This course consists principally of class discussion, student presentations, and a final paper of no more than ten pages. Grade distribution will be, more or less, divided equally among these three activities

The moderator of the seminar is John Adams who holds degrees from Rutgers University (BA, 1965), Seton Hall University (JD, 1968), and New York University (LLM, 1975). Later, he served as a captain in the Judge Advocate General Corps of the Air Force. Mr. Adams practiced law for 15 years and was president of a New York based investment firm for 20 years. After retiring in 2004, Mr. Adams became the Chairman of the Oxford University affiliated Foundation for Law, Justice and Society.  The Foundation promotes an understanding of the role that law plays in society. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the National Center for Law and Economic Justice, based in New York City. The Center advances the cause of economic justice for low-income families, individuals, and communities across the country. It is his intention of bringing these experiences to the seminar discussions.

Advanced Studies in Law - The Law of Higher Education
01:790:410:H3 Index #51420
Instructor: Jonathan Alger- Vice President and General Counsel
M 2:50-5:50P  SC-207
College Ave Campus

This seminar will explore key laws and legal concepts applicable to American institutions of higher education. With a focus on the educational mission, the notion of academic freedom, and the unique features of the higher education context, the course will focus on how the law balances the rights and responsibilities of colleges and universities and their many and varied constituencies--including faculty, staff, students, and the public at large. The course will also explore the increasingly complex regulatory environment facing colleges and universities, and the relationships of these institutions to all levels of government. Specific topics of discussion will include (among others): the rights and responsibilities of faculty and students; the codes of conduct and due process; freedom of expression; freedom from discrimination; affirmative action; the roles of religion and politics in higher education; ownership and use of intellectual property in the academic environment; and the regulation of intercollegiate athletics.

The course format will include class discussion, with small group exercises. All students will be expected to complete the reading each week and to participate actively in discussions.  The class requirements will include a research paper and an open-book, take-home final exam.

Jonathan Alger is Vice President and General Counsel at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, where he oversees all legal affairs for the University and advises its governing boards and administration.  Before coming to Rutgers, he was Assistant General Counsel at the University of Michigan, where he helped coordinate two landmark admissions lawsuits in the U.S. Supreme Court.  Mr. Alger previously served as counsel for the national office of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in Washington, DC, and as an attorney-advisor in the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. Mr. Alger graduated with Honors from Harvard Law School and High Honors from Swarthmore College.

PSYCHOLOGY

Conditioning and Learning
01:830:311:H1 Index #53565
MTH 10:20-11:40A    PSY- 301
Busch Campus

Infant and Child Development
01:830:331:H1 Index #53834
W 01:40P-04:40P    PSY- 307
Busch Campus

Advanced Topics in Human Cognition

01:830:401:H1 Index #54768
Professor Glass 
TTH 01:40-03:00P     ARC -207
Busch Campus

 
History of Psychology
01:830:470:H1 Index #53574
Professor Wilder 
TF 010:20A-11:40P    BE- 201
Livingston Campus

 


 

 

 


 

Spring 2011 Honors Sections of SAS Courses

Not included in this list are departmental honors thesis courses.  For information about those programs and courses, go to individual department websites.

 

Administrative Studies (Rutgers Business School)

Anthropology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Comparative Literature

Economics

French

Linguistics

Mathematics

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Spanish

Women and Gender Studies


Administrative Studies (Rutgers Business School)

 

Intro to Business (3)

33:011:100:H1 Index#53086

TF  12:00 - 01:20P    LSH     B112    LIV

 

Intro to Finance for NonMajors (3)

33:011:203:H1 Index# 50958

TTH  03:20- 04:40P    BE       213       LIV

Not open to RBS students

 

Anthropology

 

Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)

Professor L. Ahearn

01:070:108:H1 Index# 54608

M TH       09:15 - 10:35A   RAB    001       C/D

M         10:55A - 12:15P   RAB    018       C/D

 

This course introduces students to the fascinating complexity of language in actual social contexts.  Students will learn about how language both reflects and shapes thought, culture, and power.  Topics will include language acquisition and socialization, language and gender, language and ethnicity, and language and social change.  Students will also have opportunities to apply the concepts we study to their everyday experiences with language through hands-on activities and exercises.  There is no prerequisite for the course other than an interest in the workings of language in real-life settings.

 

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Biological Sciences

 

Brain, Mind, and Behavior (3)

01:119:195:H1 Index# 55736

Professor J. Schjott

MW     10:20 - 11:40A   SEC     212       BUS

Open to First Year Students Only

 

Brain, Mind, and Behavior (3)

01:119:195:H2 Index# 57552

Professor J. Schjott

MW     10:20 - 11:40A   SEC     212       BUS

Open to Sophomores Only

 

Brain, Mind, and Behavior (3)

01:119:195:H3: Index# 57553

Professor J. Schjott

MW      10:20- 11:40A   SEC     212       BUS

The course will be organized around case stories in the fields of neurology and neuroscience.  Several of the case stories are written by neuroscientist and medical doctor V.S. Ramachandran and by neurologist Oliver Sacks.  They both write about patients with neurological deficits in a way that is captivating and fascinating for lay people, but also with enough detail and explanation of the underlying brain mechanisms to be useful as a first view into neuroscience. Articles by other authors from magazines such as The New Yorker, New York Times Magazine and Scientific American will also be used in the course. The course is aimed at honors students with an interest in the topic, but who may not necessarily be science majors. No prior knowledge of neurology or neuroscience is required.

 

Psysiological Adaptation: Heart, Stress and Exercise (3)

01:119:194:01 Index# 51250

Professor: R. Golfetti

MW        05:00 P – 06:20   ARC    107       BUS

This Honors course takes an integrative approach to physiology by discussing our understanding of the body’s ability to adjust and adapt to internal and external environmental challenges in a historical perspective.

 

Chemistry

 

Honors General Chemistry (4)

01:160:164:H1 Index# 46255

Professors: J. Krenos, M. Cotter

MW      01:55P - 02:50P    WL      AUD    BUS

H         03:35P - 04:30P    WL      AUD    BUS

W        10:35A - 11:30A   SEC     209       BUS

Prereq: 160:163   Coreq: 640:136 Or 640:138 Or 640:152 Or Equivalent      

 

Honors General Chemistry (4)

01:160:164:H2 Index# 46256

Professors: J. Krenos, M. Cotter

MW      01:55P - 02:50P    WL      AUD    BUS

H         03:35P - 04:30P    WL      AUD    BUS

W        12:15P - 01:10P    WL       AUD   BUS

Prereq: 160:163   Coreq: 640:136 Or 640:138 Or 640:152 Or Equivalent

 

Principles of Organic Chemistry (4)

01:160:316:01 Index#50259

Professors: Romsted, Roth

TTH     06:40P - 08:00P    ARC    103       BUS

H         05:15 P - 06:10P    ARC    108       BUS

Prereq: 01:160:307 OR 01:160:315 and permission of instructor. Lectures are shared with 01:160:308

 

Principles of Organic Chemistry (4)

01:160:316:02 Index# 40166

Professors: Romsted, Roth

MW      03:20P - 04:40P    ARC    103       BUS

M         05:15P - 06:10P    SEC     202       BUS

Prereq: 01:160:307 OR 01:160:315 and permission of instructor. Lectures are shared with 01:160:308

 

Principles of Organic Chemistry (4)

01:160:316:03 Index# 52365

Professors: Romsted, Roth

MTH    12:35 P - 01:55P    HCK    138       C/D

H         02:30 P - 03:25P    HCK    202       C/D

Prereq: 01:160:307 OR 01:160:315 and permission of instructor. Lectures are shared with 01:160:308

 

Principles of Organic Chemistry (4)

01:160:316:04 Index# 57000

Professors: Romsted, Roth

MW      0320 P - 0440    ARC    103       BUS

W        0515 P - 0610    SEC     217       BUS

See Schedule of classes for details

Prereq: 01:160:307 OR 01:160:315 and permission of instructor. Lectures are shared with 01:160:308

 

Comparative Literature

 

Literature Across Borders (3)

01:195:201:H1 Index# 50169

Professor Parker

H         09:50 - 11:10A   MI        100       CAC

M         09:50 - 11:10A   Meets at 195 College Ave

 

Economics

 

Introduction to Macroeconomics (3)

01:220:103:H1 Index# 44777

Professor N. Sheflin

MTH        09:50 - 11:10A   MU      301       CAC

PREREQS: See online schedule for prereqs

 

French

 

Approaches to French Literature (3)

01:420:218:H1 Index# 48957

Professor Pairet

MTH         10:55A - 12:15P   RAB    109A    C/D

PREREQ: 01:420:132 OR PLACEMENT TEST OR PERMISSION OF DEPT.

CREDIT NOT GIVEN FOR THIS COURSE & 01:420:216 

 

Topics French/Flaubert in Theory (3)

01:420: 392:H1 Index# 55978

Professor Parker

MTH       11:30A - 12:50P   SC        119       CAC

The personification of the novelist’s novelist, Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) has often been credited with having made modern fiction possible. Flaubert’s enormous reputation as a novelist rests on a surprisingly small corpus, however—small enough for us to read all of it in one semester: Madame Bovary (1857), Salambô (1862), Sentimental Education (1869), The Temptation of St Anthony (1874), Three Tales (1877), and the posthumously published Bouvard and Pécuchet (1881). This course will survey these works along with an ample selection from Flaubert’s letters. Since the history of modern literary theory can plausibly be told as the history of commentary on Flaubert, also considered are the work of such theorists as Georg Lukács, Erich Auerbach, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gérard Genette, Pierre Bourdieu, Hélène Cixous, and Jacques Rancière as each endeavored to define the nature of Flaubert’s achievement.

 

Linguistics

 

Intro to Linguistic Theory (3)

01:615:201:H1 Index# 54899

Professor Akinlabi

TTH        01:10 - 02:30P    SEM     108       CAC

PREREQ FOR ALL 300 LEVEL & ABOVE 

 

Mathematics

 

Topics in Math for the Liberal Arts-Honors (3)

01:640:103:H1 Index# 50219

TF          0950 A - 1110   MU      112       CAC

PREREQ: 640:026 OR 027 OR PLACEMENT

 

For thousands of years, people have tried to communicate secretly and securely.  Cryptography is the field of mathematics dedicated to exploring schemes to conceal messages and to verifying the difficulty of breaking those schemes.  Because of the growth of computer network use, there has been an enormous increase in cryptographic work in the past few years.  This course will present mathematical concepts and processes within the context of social issues related to cryptography.  Issues explored may include the security of email; the privacy of medical records; the security of financial transactions; and the future of copyright in the digital world.  Mathematical tools such as modular addition, finite fields, combinatorics, number theory, probability, group theory, and algorithms will be introduced.

 

This course is suitable only for students who would ordinarily be taking Math for the Liberal Arts.  The Department of Mathematics has a 300-level course in cryptography for Math majors and minors.

 

For information about registration in other honors courses in the Department of Mathematics (Honors Calculus I for Math/Physics, 640:151:H1 and H2; Honors Calculus II for Math/Physics, 640:152:H1; Honors Multivariable Calculus, 640:251:H1 and H2; Honors Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning, 640:300:H1), go to the Department of Mathematics Honors Course Information Page:

 

math.rutgers.edu/undergrad/Honors/honcourses.html or contact the Undergraduate Mathematics Office (Hill Center 303) at 732-445-2390.

 

Calc II Math/Phys (4)

01:640:152:H1 Index# 45708

MWTH       05:00- 06:20P    ARC    333       BUS

PREREQ: CALCULUS I / By Permission: Department Staff

 

Multivariable Calc (4)

01:640:251:H1 Index# 48984

MWTH        05:00 P - 06:20    ARC    204       BUS

By Permission: Department Staff   PREREQS: See online schedule for prereqs

 

Philosophy

 

Eating Right: The Ethics of Food Choices and Food Policy (4)

SAS Signature Course

01:730:252:H1 Index # 54659

Professor A. Egan

W         09:50 - 11:10A   SC 135       CAC

F          02:50 - 04:10P    SC  135       CAC

W         11:45A - 12:40P   SC  104       CAC

Thought much about food lately? What are the environmental and social consequences of various eating habits? What moral obligations, if any, do we have toward non-human animals? Do the answers to these questions generate moral obligations to adopt (or to abandon) particular eating habits? How are our individual and societal decisions about what to eat expressive of aesthetic, moral, cultural, and religious values?

 

What's the moral (and policy) significance of particular cultural culinary traditions, and of the importance of cultural group membership to individual well-being? What choices should we as individuals make and what actions should we as a society take to influence how our food is grown, processed, marketed, sold, and consumed? 

 

This course is particularly recommended for students who intend to pursue majors or minors in the various area studies, anthropology, business, history, life sciences, philosophy, political science, public policy, religion, social justice, and sociology. The course carries credit towards the major or minor in philosophy. It can be used to fulfill the SAS humanities, diversity, and writing intensive requirements.

 

Physics

 

Concepts of Physics (3)

01:750:106:H1 Index# 48221

MTH    11:30A - 12:50P   VD       211       CAC

 

HONORS PHYSICS II (3)

01:750:272:H1 Index# 44155

Professor: M. Kalelkar

MW         03:35 - 04:30P   PHY    LH       BUS

H         10:35 - 11:30A   ARC    206       BUS

PREREQ: 01:750:271 

 

HONORS PHYSICS II (3)

01:750:272:H2 Index# 44217

Professor: M. Kalelkar

MW         03:35 - 04:30P    PHY    LH       BUS

F          12:15 - 01:10P    ARC    206       BUS

PREREQ: 01:750:271 

 

HONORS PHYSICS II (3)

01:750:272:H3  Index# 44546

Professor: M. Kalelkar

MW         03:35 - 04:30P    PHY    LH       BUS

F          01:55 - 02:50P    ARC    206       BUS

PREREQ: 01:750:271 

 

HONORS PHYSICS II (3)

01:750:272:H4 Index# 53752

Professor: M. Kalelkar

MW        03:35 - 04:30P    PHY    LH       BUS

F          03:35 - 04:30P    ARC    206       BUS

PREREQ: 01:750:271 

 

Political Science

 

Advanced Studies in Law I (3)

01:790:410:H1 Index# 48502

Professor J. Adams

T          02:50 - 05:50P    MI        010       CAC

Class Level:   Junior   Senior

 

Advanced Studies in Law I (3)

01:790:410:H3 Index# 49185

Professor Alger

W        08:10- 11:10A   SC        104       CAC

Class Level:  Junior   Senior

 

Psychology

 

General Psychology (3)

01:830:101:H1:51666

Professor Brill

MW  05:00 - 06:20P    BE       219       LIV

This course will explore the wide variety of topics and issues in the scientific study of mind and behavior, with a particular emphasis on (1) areas of theoretical unity and disunity within the discipline, and (2) the psychology of happiness and well-being.

 

Conditioning and Learning (3)

01:830:311:H1:55074

Professor C. Rovee-Collier

TTH 12:00 - 01:20P    PSY     301       BUS

STUDENTS REGISTERED IN H SECTIONS MUST HAVE GPA OF 3.2 OR HIGHER

CoReq/PreReq:  01:830:101

 

Spanish

 

Intro to Study of Language (3)

01:940:261:H1:55673

Professor O. Nunez

TF  10:55A - 12:15P   HCK    205       C/D

By Permission: Department Staff

CoReq/PreReq:   01:940:202 or 01:940:204

 

Women’s and Gender Studies

 

War: Critical Perspectives (3)

SAS Signature Course

01:988:270:H1:54962

Professor E. Brooks

W     10:55A - 12:15P   RAB    001       C/D

W      12:35- 01:55P    FS        101       C/D

 

Has the “war on terror” affected your life?  In the absence of military conscription, do U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, or Guantanamo influence everyday life within the United States?  How are we to make sense of Humvees on the highway or camouflage gear as a fashion trend?  Are there connections between genocide and gang membership, or between war and particular modes of labor and production, or between military bases and sexual violence?  Does “homeland security” make you more or less secure?

 

This course contrasts dominant accounts of war developed by international relations scholars with analyses of the raced and gendered aspects and consequences of war for both domestic and foreign policies.  It considers the displacement, migration, refugee experiences, nation-building, changing labor regimes, production practices, and rights regimes.

 

This course is particularly recommended for students pursuing majors or minors in women's and gender studies, sociology, area studies and studies of race and ethnicity,  colonial and postcolonial studies, criminal justice,  geography, history, journalism and media studies, Middle Eastern studies, political science/international relations, psychology, and social justice.  This course carries credit toward the major and minor in Women’s and Gender Studies. It can be used to fulfill the SAS interdisciplinary, diversity, or global awareness requirements.

Spring 2010 Honors Sections of SAS Courses

For information about meeting times and locations, see the Schedule of Classes at soc.ess.rutgers.edu/soc.

 

 


 

 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

 

Physiological Adaptation: Heart, Stress and Exercise (Honors)

01:119:194:01:73272

This Honors course takes an integrative approach to physiology by discussing our understanding of the body’s ability to adjust and adapt to internal and external environmental challenges in a historical perspective.

 

BLOUSTEIN SCHOOL

 

Human Rights & Health

10:762:462:01:74380 or 10:832:462:01:74029

Jr./Sr. only

 

Gender & Development Planning

10:762:485:01:74379

Jr./Sr. only

 

Media & Public Policy

10:762:495:02:72491

 

Religion & Public Policy

10:762:496:01:74382

 

CHEMISTRY

 

Honors General Chemistry

01:160:164:H1:66551

01:160:164:H2:66552

Pre-requisite: 160:163

 

Principles of Organic Chemistry

01:160:316

Pre-requisite: 160:315

 

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

 

Literature Across Borders

01:195:201:H1:71336

Friendship--At first glance it seems to be a natural and unproblematic part of human experience. But if we look at its treatment in literary texts produced in different times and places, the concept of friendship becomes surprisingly complex. Drawing on a variety of literary and cinematic representations, this course explores the practice of comparative literature in relation to several friendship themes: a friend as another self; same gender and cross-gender friendships; its universality versus cultural specificity; its relationship to the homoerotic; and its special manifestation in warrior culture.

 

ECONOMICS

 

Introduction to Macroeconomics – Honors

01:220:103:H1:64971

Pre- or Co-Requisite: 01:640:111 or 115 or placement

 

FRENCH

 

Approaches to French Literature - Honors

01:420:218:H1:69679

Introduction to French Literature through close readings of texts from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.  We will pay special attention to the nature of literary works (genre, style, structure, narrative voice) and to the goals and methods of literary analysis.  Readings include the medieval tale of La châtelaine de Vergy and excerpts from Le roman de renart; prose and poetry from major Renaissance authors (Rabelais, Montaigne, Ronsard, Labé); two plays (Corneille’s Le Cid, Molière’s Dom Juan) and tales (Perrault’s Contes) from the classical age; a philosophical tale (Voltaire’s L’ingénu) and a philosophical dialogue (Diderot’s Entretiens d’un philosophe avec la Maréchale) from the Enlightenment; and excerpts from the Encyclopédie.

 

This course is an Honors equivalent to French 216.  It is not permissible to take both 216 AND 218.)  Prerequisite: placement test or 420:132.  Enrollment is by Special Permission # only; for a SP#, contact Professor Allamand at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

LINGUISTICS

 

Introduction to the Study of Language-Honors

01:615:101:H1:74006

 

MATH

 

Topics of Math for Liberal Arts

01:640:103:H1:71430

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This course covers the mathematics of communicating secrets, with attention to both historical and present day encryption and decryption methods.  The course also discusses some of the public policy and political issues surrounding the use of cryptology, including media copy protection, electronic voting machines, and international and domestic surveillance.

 

 

Calculus II for Math and Physics

01:640:152:H1:65973

 

Seminar in Mathematics II

01:640:196:H1:66826

 

Multivariable Calculus

01:640:251:H1:69718

 

Math Seminar

01:640:492:H1:67192

 

PHYSICS

 

Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science – Honors

01:750:106:H1:68788

This course is designed for humanities and social science students.  There are no prerequisites and no mathematical problem-solving. The course will focus upon major astronomical and physical discoveries in the scientific and social context of their time, from Aristotle to the present. Topics will include Greek astronomy and science, Galileo, Newton, the mechanical universe, gravity, entropy, the arrow of time, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic induction and waves, optics, relativity, quantum theory, X-rays, atoms, nuclei, anti-matter, and black holes. The emphasis will be on understanding the world in which we live and how things work around us, from nature, to simple devices, to high-tech equipment. The course will be conceptual, qualitative, and, hopefully, student-active, with class discussions and simple hands-on experiments conducted at the Math/Science Learning Center.

 

Honors Physics II

01:750:272:H1, H2, H3, H4

Pre-requisite: 01:750:271

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

Advanced Studies in Law -- The Role of Courts in Democratic Society

01:790:410:H1:69122

Instructor - John Adams, Esq.

This seminar is intended to examine not so much the correctness of judicial decisions, but the role courts properly should play in the democratic process. Democracy has been described as governance by the majority, subject to the rule of law. We will review the nature of law, and what we mean by "the rule of law;" the social functions of law and courts; the concepts of judicial reasoning and review; and the court's function in the constitutional separation of powers and checks and balances. While the discussion will focus principally on courts in the United States, we will also look at courts in other developed and developing countries.  This course consists principally of class discussion, student presentations, and a final paper of no more than ten pages. Grade distribution will be, more or less, divided equally among these three activities. 

 

Advanced Studies in Law -- The Law of Higher Education

01:790:410:H3:69955

Instructor: Jonathan Alger, Senior Vice President and General Counsel

This seminar will explore key laws and legal concepts applicable to American institutions of higher education. With a focus on the educational mission, the notion of academic freedom, and the unique features of the higher education context, the course will focus on how the law balances the rights and responsibilities of colleges and universities and their many and varied constituencies--including faculty, staff, students, and the public at large. The course will also explore the increasingly complex regulatory environment facing colleges and universities, and the relationships of these institutions to all levels of government. Specific topics of discussion will include (among others): the rights and responsibilities of faculty and students; the codes of conduct and due process; freedom of expression; freedom from discrimination; affirmative action; the roles of religion and politics in higher education; ownership and use of intellectual property in the academic environment; and the regulation of intercollegiate athletics. The course format will include class discussion, with small group exercises. All students will be expected to complete the reading each week and to participate actively in discussions. The class requirements will include a research paper and an open-book, take-home final exam.

 

PSYCHOLOGY

 

General Psychology

01:830:101:H1:74332

rci.rutgers.edu/~gbrill/SecH1_Syllabus.htm

 

Advanced Topics in Personality Psychology: Soul Searching

01:830:442:H1:74746

Registration restrictions: junior or senior status, declared psychology major, and member of the SAS Honors Program

 

Ninety-six percent of adults in the United States believe they have souls.  A large percentage (75%-85%) of these individuals also believe their souls will survive their deaths.  This course features in-depth investigations into the following questions: What is the soul?  What are its various definitions?  In what ways are soul beliefs adaptive?  Answering these questions opens many doors into topics in psychology and related fields.  For instance, there is research indicating that children are "natural dualists" meaning that making a distinction between the mind and the body is "natural".  "Theory of mind" research with children also pertains to the topic of dualism.  Information about the human brain and its evolution also bears on this topic, particular as it pertains to the cognitive circuitry involved in the formation and maintenance of afterlife beliefs.  These are only a few of the topics and areas of investigation that are relevant to the interdisciplinary mix of ideas that will be covered in the course.  Course grades will be determined on the bases of periodic essay examinations and a final 15-20 page scholarly paper.

 

RUTGERS BUSINESS SCHOOL

 

Introduction to Business

33:011:100:H1:76651

No Prerequisite

Introduction to the functions and operation of contemporary business.  Students will get an overview of the various functions of business and how they work together in the current business environment.

 

Introduction to Finance for Non-business Majors (3)

33:011:203:H1:72684

No prerequisite

Introduction to concepts of value, valuation of financial instruments, capital budgeting, risk and return, and security analysis

For non-business majors only  

No credit for business majors

Credit not given for both this course and 33:390:300

 

THEATER

 

Theater Criticism

07:965:401:01:71452

Professor Eileen Blumenthal has offered to permit three upper-class (juniors and seniors) SAS Honors Program students to enroll in her course on theater criticism, with preference for students who have taken some theater or drama courses already.

 

The course is a seminar/workshop on writing theater criticism, and will involved seeing, discussing, and writing about live theater productions and doing close editing of student writing.

 

For further information about the course, and to discuss possible enrollment, please contact Professor Blumenthal directly by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Spring 2012 Honors Sections

 Not included in this list are departmental honors thesis courses.  For information about those programs and courses, go to individual department websites.

  • Administrative Studies- Rutgers Business School
  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Comparative Literature
  • Economics
  • French
  • Linguistics
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Spanish

Read more: Spring 2012 Honors Sections


honors program offices

BUSCH CAMPUS COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS DOUGLASS CAMPUS LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
Nelson Biological Labs
Room A-110
P 848-445-3912
Milledoler Hall
Room 119
P 848-932-1406
College Hall
Room 306
P 848-932-2011
Lucy Stone Hall
Room A-201
P 848-445-3206

Contact Us

35collegeave

35 College Avenue
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


P 848-932-7964
F 732-932-2957
E honors@sas.rutgers.edu